Politics

C’R Southern Senatorial District: Why It Is Akamkpa/Biase Turn To Occupy The Senate.

By Nkebem Asuquo

The past few months have witnessed Cross Riverians across political and ethnic divides engage in political conversations about whether or not power should return to the southern part of the state. I am particularly delighted that many Cross Riverians are becoming more politically conscious and participatory in the electoral process of our dear state.

When the incumbent governor, Prof. Ben Ayade was still a member of the PDP and seeking re-election, so many Cross Riverians spoke out in support of his ambition to complete the traditional two tenures of northern Cross River. Many of those that spoke in the governor’s favour were prominent political heavyweights from the southern part of the state. Eventually, their voices were heard and governor Ayade was successfully returned elected.

For those honest Cross Riverians and other prominent political heavyweights from the south who openly promoted that cause, their reasons were simple and included, the promotion of fairness, justice, and equity. Another reason was not to distort the unwritten rotational agreement in the state so that at the end of the eight years reign of Ayade, power will naturally return to the south. In the end, governor Ayade kept to his promise, and now within the ruling APC, a southerner has emerged as the standard flag bearer of the party.

Now, within the southern senatorial district of the state which comprises 3 federal constituencies, of the 24 years of the current democratic dispensation, Akpabuyo, Bakassi and Calabar south federal constituency has represented the senatorial district for 20 years, while Calabar municipality/Odukpani federal constituency had a 4 years stint. Sadly, Akamkpa/Biase remains the only federal constituency that is yet to get an opportunity to represent the senatorial district.

While Calabar municipality/Odukpani would have wanted to make a case for themselves having had only a term, it is instructive to note that they have been compensated with a gubernatorial ticket of the All Progressives Congress, which automatically knocks off their chances. It is natural for all well-meaning indigenes from the southern extraction to drum support and wholeheartedly support for the senatorial seat to be moved to Akamkpa/Biase federal constituency.

Thankfully, Rt. Hon. Daniel Asuquo has emerged from the Labour Party as a candidate for that seat. It is pertinent for all men and women of character and uprightness to speak with one voice in support of the candidature of Rt. Hon. Daniel Asuquo. Sentiment aside, Rt. Hon. Daniel Asuquo is a firm believer in the power rotation. He never shied away from articulating this while in the PDP, and he even warned the party against doing the contrary. He is still standing strong by this position which remains unwaivered, “Back to the South”. This further proves his sincerity, credibility and one who is transparent, balanced and that can be trusted.

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This is a Clarion call for all those who agitated for the return of power to the south, to rise and speak with one voice against the Injustice against our dear brothers and sisters from Akamkpa and Biase part of the state which makes up the ‘7 alive’ region to speak, vote and encourage others to vote for a candidate from that region who in this case is Rt. Hon. Daniel Asuquo of the Labour Party.

As the saying goes, one good turn deserves another.

Apart from being the right thing to do, Rt. Hon. Daniel Asuquo comes into the race with a lot of fresh experience and insight into the workings of the national assembly, a track record of giant achievements and effective representation, mass appeal and accessibility, and importantly, wide acceptability from the people.

I call on all Cross Riverians from the southern extraction who are up to voting age, to register and obtain their Permanent Voters Card and on election day, go out and vote for Rt. Hon. Daniel Asuquo of the Labour party represents justice, fairness, and equity.

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